All Explainers posts:

All you need to know about Sourcify

Welcome to Sourcify’s first short FAQ! If your questions around source verification haven’t been answered after reading this post, please feel free to drop by the Sourcify Gitter channel and ask us any question there. Also stay tuned on more turorials and developer focused content to follow here and on the Remix blog! [Read More]

Solidity 0.6.x features: inheritance

Similar to object-oriented programming in Solidity - a contract-oriented language - the inheritance and polymorphism features are as widely adopted and critical for the language evolution. There is hardly any Solidity developer who hasn’t used these language features in their contracts to decouple logic and increase code reuse. With version 0.6 of the language the main improvements introduced are to make existing rules explicit in addition to introducing interface inheritance and disallowing the dangerous state variable shadowing. The compiler continues... [Read More]

Solidity 0.6.x features: Array Slices

Starting from version 0.6.0, Solidity supports array slices. Array slices are handy when you want to reference a contiguous portion of an array but do not want to perform a full copy of that portion. For now, array slices are only supported for calldata arrays. [Read More]

Solidity 0.6.x features: Saving Storage Costs with Immutables

With version 0.6.5, Solidity introduced the immutable keyword for state variables. Immutable state variables can only be assigned during contract creation, but will remain constant throughout the life-time of a deployed contract. The big advantage of immutables is that reading them is significantly cheaper than reading from regular state variables, since immutables will not be stored in storage, but their values will be directly inserted into the runtime code. [Read More]

Solidity 0.6.x features: fallback and receive functions

In versions of Solidity before 0.6.x, developers typically used the fallback function to handle logic in two scenarios: contract received ether and no data contract received data but no function matched the function called The main use case of the pre-0.6.x fallback function is to receive ether and react to it, a typical pattern used by token-style contracts to reject transfers, emit events or forward the ether. The function executes when a contract is called without any data e.g. via... [Read More]

Solidity 0.6.x features: try/catch statement

This post was originally published on the Ethereum blog. The try/catch syntax introduced in 0.6.0 is arguably the biggest leap in error handling capabilities in Solidity, since reason strings for revert and require were released in v0.4.22. Both try and catch have been reserved keywords since v0.5.9 and now we can use them to handle failures in external function calls without rolling back the complete transaction (state changes in the called function are still rolled back, but the ones in... [Read More]